The NASA Langley laminar-flow-control experiment on a swept, supercritical airfoil
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The NASA Langley laminar-flow-control experiment on a swept, supercritical airfoil evaluation of initial perforated configuration by

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Published by National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Scientific and Technical Information Office in [Washington, DC] .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Laminar flow.,
  • Aerodynamics, Transonic.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesNASA Langley laminar flow control experiment on a swept, supercritical airfoil
StatementCharles D. Harris ... [et al.].
SeriesNASA technical memorandum -- 4309
ContributionsHarris, Charles D., 1952-.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination1 v.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17105618M

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DESIGN OF A LAMINAR-FLOW-CONTROL SHPERCRITICAL AIRFOIL FOR A SWEPT WING Dennis 0. Allison and John R. Dagenhart NASA Langley Research Center SUMMARY An airfoil was analytically designed and analyzed for a combination of supercritical flow and laminar flow control (LFC) by boundary-layer suction. Get this from a library! The NASA Langley laminar-flow-control experiment on a swept supercritical airfoil: basic results for slotted configuration. [Charles D Harris; United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Scientific and Technical Information Division.;]. This paper concerns one of the NASA in-house activities, the Langley Laminar Flow Control (LFC) Project, which was carried out in the Langley 8-foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel (8-ft TPT). The idea for such an undertaking came from Dr. Werner Pfenninger in and stemmed, primarily, from a desire to know more about the compatability of a high Cited by: 3. Brooks, C. and Harris, C., , Results of LFC experiment on slotted, swept supercritical airfoil in Langley’s 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel, NASA Symposium on NLF and LFC Research, NASA CP , pp. – Google ScholarCited by: 2.

*** NOTE: The NASA HSR Program was phased out in fiscal year *** Supersonic Laminar Flow Control One goal of NASA's High-Speed Research (HSR) program is to achieve laminar, or smooth, airflow over the surface of an aircraft's wing while flying at supersonic speeds. Oct 22,  · Help NASA SBIR/STTR Program Support For questions about the NASA SBIR/STTR solicitations, the proposal preparation and electronic submission process, and other program related areas, please contact the NASA SBIR/STTR Program Support Office. Phone: Email: [email protected] NASA SBIR/STTR Program Support is available Monday through Friday from . Dec 01,  · This NASA Facts explores the history of NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, this country's first civilian aeronautics laboratory. Several major episodes in the epic story of American aerospace have their roots in the research contributions made by Langley since its establishment in The NASA Langley laminar-flow-control experiment on a swept, supercritical airfoil: evaluation of initial perforated configuration / (Washington, D.C.: National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Office of Management, Scientific and Technical Information Program, ), by Charles D. Harris and Langley Research Center (page images at.

Exploration of a Slotted Airfoil Laminar-Flow-Control Concept NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) NASA Langley Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel Theory vs. Experiment October 22–24, NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate FY12 LEARN Phase I . High Reynolds number investigation of a flush-mounted, S-duct inlet with large amounts of boundary layer ingestion. The NASA Langley laminar-flow-control experiment on a swept, supercritical airfoil: suction coefficient analysis / (Washington, D.C.: National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Office of Management, Scientific and Technical Information Program ; Springfield, Va. Design of a Swept-Wing Laminar Flow Control Flight Experiment for Transonic Aircraft A laminar flow, swept airfoil was designed to operate at conditions of Mach number M = candidate aircraft selections nor the objectives of the experiment. Figure 1. The NASA G-II/SP (NNA) on a tarmac in El Paso, TX.